Tag Archives: Embossing

Pulp Atlas Exhibition Work

Facebooktwitterpinteresttumblr

Finally finished my edition of 16 books, 11 or which will be sent of round the US and UK later this year as part of the Pulp Atlas Exhibition. Each book in the series is entitled ‘Littoral Drift’ and features two hand embossed paper slips of Progeo map paper, housed in a card sleeve. Once again the work explores the idea of erosion/accretion, this time picking out Special Areas of Conservation or Sites of Special Scientific Interest between two points on the coast.

Littoral Drift #1 Littoral Drift #2 Littoral Drift #3 Littoral Drift #4 Littoral Drift #5 Littoral Drift #6

Facebooktwitterpinteresttumblr

New Embossing Work

Facebooktwitterpinteresttumblr

The drawings I posted up a few days back that use sandpaper and other abrasives to explore map making, walking and erosion all have counterparts that look at the opposite of erosion – accretion.

The Suffolk coast is influenced by a process called long shore drift (or littoral drift), a process which basically moves sediments at an angle along the coastline from one location to another. One of the reasons that Covehithe has been assigned a status of No Active Intervention (meaning no attempt will be made to preserve the coastline) is that the movement of sediment to the south is considered beneficial to the protection of more ‘important’ settlements to the south.  Ever noticed all the groynes at Felixstowe? Well they are there to help protect the beach, and to prevent the loss of sediment. Now notice the lack of groynes at Covehithe.

Anyhow, this counterpart embossing work is my way of once again manipulating materials to mirror or represent natural processes.

Accretion #1 Accretion #2 Accretion #3 Accretion #4 Accretion #5

Facebooktwitterpinteresttumblr

First Large Scale Embossing Attempt

Facebooktwitterpinteresttumblr

I had a first attempt today at embossing on Somerset printmaking paper, using one of the stencils I have spent the last week cutting by hand. Happy with the results and the paper was nice to work with. Somerset, made by St Cuthberts Mill, really is a very nice, tactile paper. I’ve been using it for some time now for drawing, but this is the first time I’ve attempted embossing on it. Results pictured below.

Embossing Attempt #1Embossing Attempt #1 (Detail 2)Embossing Attempt #1 (Detail 1)

Facebooktwitterpinteresttumblr