Tag Archives: Participatory Research

Animated Participant Group Drawings

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I’ve finally got around to putting together the animations of the group drawings that the research participants made on 17th May.

There are four animations of each drawing, This is because the drawings were worked on from all sides, meaning there is not top, bottom, left or right to each drawing.

The participants seemed to be in agreement that they would like some kind of soundtrack to the animations, so what you hear is the North Sea meeting Covehithe beach.

Each drawing fades in  and out twice – symbolic of the tides.

The next step is to turn these into a DVD for the participants as a thank you for taking part. The animations on the DVD will be in higher resolution but you should be able to get the flavour of them in the clips below.

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Talking, Walking, Drawing

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Field Research
Participants working on the beach

Well, waking early on Saturday morning my hopes for reasonable weather for the day’s research activities were dealt a blow. I knew before I opened my eyes that it was  raining, as I could hear water spilling from a newly discovered overflowing blocked gutter outside the bedroom window. The rain continued while I walked my dog, and continued as I made my way up the A12. Shortly before I got to Wrentham the rain eased up but the weather remained gusty and the sky stayed leaden.

The weather didn’t help the nervous feeling I had as I waited for the person with the hall key to arrive but wasn’t completely to blame. The biggest source of my anxiety in the weeks leading up to the event, far greater than the worry of not having ever chaired a focus group before, or the fear of terrible weather disrupting the outdoor aspect of the day, was the thought that on the day my participants wouldn’t turn up. I am working to such tight deadlines that at this late stage recruiting new participants, booking a new venue, organising new research days really isn’t an option.

So it was just as well that by 10:30 all my participants were in the kitchen area of the hall getting to know each other and drinking tea and coffee!

The Focus Group Interview

I can’t go into too much detail of the focus group interview here for fear of biasing certain activities that are planned for next Saturday, but, listening to the discussion at the time, and later on listening to the recording at home, I realised that the participants had covered some interesting areas. Two of these which caught my ear were:

  • Nature/Culture distinctions and our human relationships with the nature and environment.
  • The coast as a site of conflict, both in terms of the inherent natural processes and in the terminology deployed to describe coastline management.

In a related but separate part of my studies I have been thinking a lot about the writings of Barbara Adam on Nature/Culture distinctions. The dominant discourse (certainly in the Western industrialised world) insists on a separation between humans and nature, underlined by the thought that we can overcome and triumph over all things natural. This worldview obscures and ignores the fact that as humans we are inextricably linked to, and depend upon, nature and environment for our survival. So for the participants to end up discussing whether erosion is a process that we learn to accept and live with, or whether it is something for us to overcome, was very timely.

My role in the Focus Group was to pose questions or suggest themes for discussion, by mostly I was able to sit back and observe interactions and dynamics. There were times when I would try to prompt participants, or ask them to expand on a point, or even to try to bring someone quieter into the conversation, but in general, I was willing to see where the conversation would go. The group seemed to click well, there were very few silences, and the silences that we did experience seemed to be due to the participants waiting for me to say something.

The focus group ran for around an hour an a half, after which we broke for lunch for 45 minutes before heading to the coast for the walking and drawing activity.

Participatory Field Research

 

Participants making their way down to the beach
Participants making their way down to the beach

While the interview was going on, the weather had quietly been improving. Until we had lunch. Then it got worse, and worse, until by 12:30 the rain was torrential.

I was considering our options. Could we walk in the rain and not draw? Could I ask participants to come an hour earlier on the 17th so we could walk then? I didn’t really know what to do. To change the plan was to fundamentally change the research. Not much time to make a decision.

And then a small patch of sky, a pale blue, appeared in the grey. And gradually got bigger. By 13:00 it was breezy but gloriously sunny. We were saved. I was saved.

Dodging the deeper puddles, participants gathered round, I handed out the sketchbooks and art packs much discussed in my last post, and we set off for the beach. I planned to hang back from the group, and let them make their own decisions as to the direction they went, when they stopped, how fast they walked, whether they stayed together or split up. My main tasks for the afternoon were to observe the way the participants decided to work, how they interacted with each other, how they engaged with the landscape and to make notes on my own thoughts regarding the progress of the field research.

Facing south towards Southwold - Participants working
Facing south towards Southwold – participants working

Once again, I can’t go into specifics at this stage for fear of influencing later activities, but I made some interesting observations relating to the different approaches to mark making, and the different approaches to positioning themselves in relation to the landscape, and the reset of the group. After an hour and a half on the beach, heavy clouds began to blow in from the south-west so I explained to the participants that we might like to consider packing up and making our way back and out of the elements.

Fine weather looking North...
Fine weather looking North…
...more dramatic weather looking South.
…more dramatic weather looking South.

Driving away from Covehithe, I passed through yet more torrential rain. The only two sunny hours of the afternoon had coincided with our visit to the beach. Perhaps I should take that as some kind of positive sign for the future of the research.

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Research Information Event – Update

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Info Packs

 

I finally have the chance to sit down a write a little about the information event that I held on Saturday 12th April. The day arrived and I made my way up the A12 to Wrentham village hall having received a handful of emails during the weeks leading up to the 12th expressing an interest in the research and in attending the event. Despite the positive feedback I was still unsure if interest would convert into actual attendance.

Happily the vast majority of those who had emailed came along, and I was able to explain the project aims, and find out about those who had come along to learn more.

After a few cups of tea and coffee, and an enjoyable discussion about the local coastline (which was interestingly close to the kind of conversation I hope to capture later in the project), the event ended with encouraging comments, with most people saying that they would be in touch to sign up for the research. One of the main points that came out of the meeting was a change of dates for the four planned research events.

It is difficult to plan a timetable when you are not aware of who you will be working with, and what their time capabilities may be. The general consensus at the meeting was that it would be preferable to condense the four sessions into two longer session running on consecutive Saturdays in May, and it is far easier for me to be flexible than expecting several people to change their plans. In fact, I think it may be beneficial to have the drawing session followed swiftly by the interview session as thoughts will still be fresh in mind. Besides, I will always have the option of asking participants for more of their thoughts after a little more time has passed.

Since Saturday, I have had four confirmed participants (thank you kind people!) leaving me with another three or four to find. A slight concern to me was the fact that three of the four participants are from an arts-based background, so to balance things up I would like some of the remaining participants to come from a non arts-based background.  With this in mind I have been in touch today with several local museums and charities asking if they would advertise the research to their members in the hope of reaching out to those who have an interest in the coast, but don’t currently make art work around that theme. Thank you to the Southwold Sailor’s Reading Room for a very quick and helpful reply, along with a kind offer to display a copy of the book of participant drawings that will be one of the outcomes of the project.

So right now I feel I have made about fifty percent progress towards finding all the participants I would like to be working with, and the search will continue over the next week or so. Alongside this search I think I will take advantage of the Easter break to spend some time considering the art practice side of the research, in particular how art works can physically embody environmental processes.

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Thank yous and nervous beginnings…

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With just over a week to go before the research information event at Wrentham village hall I have been busy attempting to publicise the event so we are not sat there, drinking coffee alone, between 10:30 and 12:00.

Village hall notice board

Thanks to help from the Parish Council and several kindly people of Wrentham and the surrounding area, posters advertising the event have gone up on village notice boards and other locations around the community. I’ve also received a great deal of help publicising the event from Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB,  SCAR, Touching the Tide, Councillor Martin Parsons and Tidal Margins – thank you all. Apologies if I have omitted thanks to anybody, there have been so many helpful people that I have lost track of who represents each organisation!

So far, I have received a few emails expressing interest in the event, so I am hopeful that word is spreading and we will be meeting some people on the 12th. The event is crucial to the success of the research as it is the one chance we will have to convince potential participants that taking part in the research will be fun and worthwhile for them.

So, in keeping with the practical administration theme dominating the research recently, I have had to prepare a participant information pack to hand out on the 12th.

The pack needs to contain:

  1. An information sheet that lets potential participants know about the purpose of the research, what they will be asked to do and informs them about issues such as confidentiality etc.
  2. A sheet to record their contact details (modified slightly in case any under 18s wish to take part under parent/guardian supervision.
  3. A project timetable that lists when events are happening and where.
  4. Consent forms – One for taking part in the research and one that covers the photography and future use of any drawings that participants make and any research materials that they generate.

So, after much procrastination I finally completed these forms today and have sent them over to my research supervisor to sign off on before they get printed.

Adding research into my practice has been testing at times (I hope to return to this theme at  a later date) and this is reflected in the fact that I can’t say I have found this process easy so far. However, whilst it is a little out of my comfort zone, it is providing me with valuable lessons about promotion and  local networking. That said, I’ll be glad when I can concentrate less on administration and devote more time to drawing.

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An introduction…

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Over the next few months this website will be used to document and reflect upon the progress of the main research project that I am undertaking as part of my MRes in Arts and Cultural Research at the University of Brighton. This blog forms the online component of a larger Visual Research diary that  will chart the course of the research in a reflexive space that pulls together art practice and research.

My research aims to work with participants from a region of Suffolk in the United Kingdom affected by coastal erosion. As part of the research participants will take part in a combination of drawing activities and participatory field research that will help them explore and articulate their connections to, and experiences of, a disappearing coastline.

Covehithe OS Map

To help address the aims of the research, the ‘data generation’ section of the project will follow four stages:

Initial Focus Group Interview  –  The first research activity will be to carry out an initial focus group interview with the participants. The main purpose of the  interview will be to establish a baseline appreciation of how participants relate to the coastline and to discuss some of the concerns participants may have regarding the use of drawing in this research as a way of exploring their experiences.

Participatory Field Research – With participant relationship to the coastline forming an important feature of the research, it is important for us to actually engage physically with the landscape that we are investigating.  With this in mind a group walk will be carried out, during which visual and word based observations will be recorded alongside participant discussions of the coastline.

Drawing Activity – The core of the research takes the form of a communal drawing activity that will allow the participants to explore their experiences and reflections of the coastline. The purpose of the drawing activity is to attempt to visually depict coastal experiences through mark marking and erasure, techniques that can be said to represent the coastal erosion processes at work in the region. The process of creating the drawings will be recorded photographically, and a stop-motion animation of the process will be placed on this website as part of the research findings.

Final Focus Group Interview – The final focus group interview will be where participant reactions to the drawing activities will be discussed alongside encouraging participants to play a role in the interpretation of their own drawings.

IMG_3293

This is a very brief overview of the project, and over the next weeks and months everything will be expanded and reflected upon. Right now, practical matters are dominating the research progress and it is practical matters that will be the subject of the next few posts.

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